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PamGodwin

PamGodwin

The Mistress (The Original Sinners, #4) - Tiffany Reisz This is one of the hardest reviews I've ever written. I adore this series. Nora Sutherland is one of my favorite heroines. But this fourth book in The Original Sinners is a pale, threadbare layer on this series' soul. The narration takes on an ADHD quality, unfocused, and distracted. Flashback after flashback occupies the majority of this book, and these aren't new back stories. They are stories you've experienced or heard in previous books. They might generate some nostalgia, but they offer no insight or momentum to the plot. Suspense is lacking in a spectacular way. Your eyes might fight to stay open. The cliff-hangers fail in their execution, yet they're placed forcefully throughout the narrative. The cornucopia of viewpoints is off-putting and holds you at a constant arm's length from the main characters. There's very little head time with the main characters, and the time you spend with Nora is eaten away with her redundant story time and profuse dialogue. Too much of both might spur you to skim ahead. The supporting cast of POVs like Grace and Laila are irritating beyond redemption. Grace is shallow, nosy, and in the way. Every time a scene began with The Rook or The Pawn, I groaned and my fingers twitched to page forward as fast and furious as I could. Why is Grace even there? She's an undeveloped character. We don't know her, don't care about her, yet she tries repeatedly to steal the spotlight. In the end, she does. I won't give away the conclusion, but the big reveal has regrettably turned me away from this series. The most crucial thing I admired and cherished about Soren is shattered in the final 20%. The sacred part of himself he held back for Nora and Kingsley for all these years is just handed off to random-character Grace. Why? Why? Why? The casualness of it cheapens his character, loses the core virtue of the series, and weakens the overall appeal for me.Despite my blatant disappointment, the outcome with Wesley is satisfying. His fate is predictable, but the 'how' is a surprise, albeit a shallow insta- kind of surprise. The best offerings in this book are the scenes between Wesley and Kingsley, and Wesley and Soren. Those conversations/confrontations are long-awaited and delightfully entertaining. They capture the essence of TR's riveting storytelling and the allure of this series. In summary, you should read this to obtain some semblance of closure, but be prepared for a thready echo of its predecessors.